Caleb Slain

C A L E B S L A I N

BIOGRAPHY

Caleb has eight siblings. And he grew up poor. Like really, really poor. His house was full of overwhelming chaos and all he wanted to do was escape. So he determined to mentally travel, existing in his imagination creating stories which caused him to discover film. In fact, he fell so deeply in love with movies that he chose to put a ring around his left ring finger to remind everyone he was already married. He was so resolute to share incredible stories that he committed himself “till,” you know, “death do us part.” And as silly as that may sound, it seems Caleb has always wanted to direct amazing stories able to create that specific feeling of love for his audience.

Caleb’s love for film exploded when he was recognized at twenty-one years old for his first short documentary, It Ain’t Over, which premiered at SXSW and Telluride Film Festival, then won Audience Awards at Santa Cruz and Heartland. But sometimes his love for film created sorrow, such as his twenty-two-minute homage to the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, which was praised by TIME, National Public Radio, Slate, Entertainment Weekly, and Hoffman’s closest friends. His personal films have received millions of internet “hearts” and six Vimeo Staff Picks, while his short films Free Pie, and Juggle & Cut, have been hijacked by a few heartbreakers to “educate” at USC, New York Film Academy, and the University of San Francisco. Not to mention, his recent accomplishment of serving as a creative and cultural brand director for Lexus and Japan altering their global repositioning which apparently started up a new love affair between them.

In 2017, his short film Demon frightened its way to winning Best Film at the Oscar-qualifying Austin Film Festival and his VR collaboration with Eminem, Marshall From Detroit, recently wrapped up its premiere at Sundance 2019.

Considering Caleb grew up in a house full of stress, he now knows when to use chaos in his films to make his audience’s eyes open a little bit wider. “It’s that gut feeling,” he says, “knowing that challenging the audience’s emotions is a director’s last and final frontier, so I purposefully create my films to rearrange their organs a little bit.” And as silly as that may sound, it seems Caleb may have actually succeeded in directing amazing stories able to create that specific feeling of love for his audience.